A Baby Boomers’ Guide to Aging in Place

A Baby Boomers’ Guide to Aging in Place
Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

If you’re one of the millions of American baby boomers approaching their 70s, you may be asking if now is an opportunity to move and downsize to a smaller, more manageable home, or to stay put in your current home and repurpose any extra space vacated by adult children.

The answer depends on your unique circumstances, of course. But for those who decide to stay put — at least for the time being — now is a great time to begin considering which, if any, modifications your home may require to better suit your needs and ensure your safety as you get older.

Rather than waiting until an incident occurs, be proactive about making alterations to your home that will help you avoid potential injury. Likewise, take advantage of a broad spectrum of new technologies that can make your home easier to manage and provide an extra layer of security.

Here are a few things to keep in mind if you are planning to “age in place.”

Prioritize Your Wish List

Take a good look at the rooms in your house to determine which ones fit your new lifestyle and which ones need some work. Some areas of the home might only need minor changes. Others might need to be repurposed altogether. Take the time to create a general plan and prioritize the items on your list.

Focus on Improving Livability

Many empty nesters hire expert remodelers to adapt their home to make it easier to maintain. Stairs can sometimes become a problem, but moving the master bedroom and the laundry room to the ground floor can be part of a solution. Doing so can give homeowners many more years in the home they love without a sense of urgency to move to a single-story home. Building professionals who have earned the National Association of Home Builders’ Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation have received training on how to build or renovate a home so that the occupants can live in it safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of their age.

Make Use of Technology

Everywhere you look these days, there is new technology. Why not put it to use in your house? Motion sensor light switches can illuminate a room as soon as you enter. They can also be connected with a home security and monitoring system, and could be configured to send help in the event of a fall or other accident. A smart refrigerator will notify you when you’re out of milk, or better yet, place an order to be delivered by your local grocer. A front door camera and microphone will allow you to see who is on your porch, even if you’re not there. If you can dream it up, there is likely a technology solution out there for it.

Expand Your Space

Depending on the age of your home, you may find that, for example, your master bedroom or bath is too small for comfort. Look for opportunities to expand those rooms into adjacent, unused or underutilized spaces. A remodeling professional is the best person to help you determine what your options are to build your dream master bathroom or bedroom. They can also help you find ways to create a more open floorplan that is easier to navigate for those with mobility concerns. Incorporating these changes will not only create a home that suits a changing lifestyle, they also may increase the value of your home when you eventually decide it’s time sell.

For more information on the most effective ways for empty nesters to remodel their home, contact Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem or visit www.hbaws.net.

Small Homes with Big Value

Small Homes with Big Value

National Homeownership Month

Small Homes with Big Value

Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

 Not all homebuyers are looking for a house with a massive floor plan – and a massive price tag. In fact, a wide variety of lifestyle changes are motivating many home owners to downsize to something more manageable. And, many first-time buyers are seeking something other than the traditional “starter” home.

Their reasons may vary, but their goals remain consistent: find a home that fits well, maximizes space and offers value. Home builders recognize the home-efficiency needs of today’s buyers, which is why an increasing number of them are finding innovative ways to deliver big value in a small(er) package.

To those who think buying a smaller home means sacrificing quality amenities, they might not know about what many refer to as the “jewel box home.” Ranging between 650-2,500 square feet, jewel box homes are generally smaller than the average single-family home, and built with high-quality materials and custom finishes tailored to the owner’s preferences.

Such homes are most appealing to newlyweds, single professionals, empty nesters or retirees – anyone with a less-is-more mentality who wants to live in a custom, yet relatively affordable home.

Every area within a jewel box home is designed with a purpose – sometimes more than one – to augment efficiency. The designs typically rely on blurring the lines between the indoors and outdoors by incorporating large sliding glass doors that open seamlessly to exterior dining and entertaining areas.

Other design elements that create space include the use of bright, chrome-brushed finishes, pocket and barn doors, dramatic lighting, floating shelves, abundant windows and continuous flooring throughout. Functionality is often enhanced with kitchen islands that double as dining tables, creative storage spaces beneath stairs and purposeful cabinetry and built-ins.

Yet still, for some, “small” isn’t small enough. A few years ago, many thought the “tiny house movement” was a passing trend, but some extreme minimalist home buyers still view tiny homes as a viable option because of their small impact on the environment and on their checkbooks.

Costing a fraction of the price of a typical single-family home, these diminutive dwellings are also a fraction of the size, often ranging between 100 and 400 square feet. Those who tend to be the most interested in tiny houses are millennials (between the ages of 25 and 34), particularly the ones who dislike home maintenance almost as much as they do the idea of a long-term mortgage.

For most people, the appeal of a simplified life in a tiny house won’t be enough to forfeit a good amount of their personal space, or outweigh the inevitable climb up a ladder each night to sleep in a loft. But home-buyer intrigue in the “tiny” concept continues to spur micro-living-inspired efficiencies within larger, more mainstream home designs.

For more information about innovative home designs that fit modern lifestyles, contact Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem 336.768.5942.

Construction Career Days – November 5, 6

Construction Career Days 2019

November 5-6, 2019 (8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.)

Setup November 4

Winston-Salem Fairgrounds & Education Building

The Chamber’s Construction Career Days event puts high school students on the path to rewarding career opportunities by showing them the latest equipment and innovations in the skilled trades while they explore an interactive environment and meet employers. We are looking to welcome 1,500 students from Forsyth and surrounding counties. Thank you for your interest in providing a unique and informative experience for students. Sponsorship Opportunities are also available. Register as an exhibitor: Online Registration

For more information, please contact Tina Long, 336-728-9204.

Congrats Preston Harris – Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist

Congrats to Preston Harris, who recently earned his Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist Educational Designation


Preston Harris, General Contractor, Solid Foundation Construction
solidfoundation39@gmail.com
SolidfoundationNC.com
336-486-4859


Winston-Salem – October 2018
Preston Harris, Solid Foundation Construction, is now one of the select group of professionals nationwide to earn the Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation, identifying him as a General Contractor with the skills and knowledge necessary to remodel or modify a home to meet the unique needs of the older population, disabled owners or their visitors.

The National Association of Home Builders, in partnership with the AARP and NAHB Research Center, created the CAPS program, which includes training and education on the technical, business management and customer service skills essential to compete in the fastest-growing segment of the residential remodeling industry — home modifications for aging-in-place.


Preston began his business in the Spring of 2009. He established Solid Foundation Construction LLC in the Summer of 2011. Preston prides himself on his creative and pragmatic approach to his clients’ goals to improve and customize their homes.
Preston and his remodeling team believe in listening to and visioning with their clients. Turning houses into dream homes is the foundation of SFC’s work.


CAPS graduates include remodelers, builders, designers, architects, occupational therapists and others who help homeowners remain in their homes safely, independently and comfortably as they age.


In three days of coursework, the CAPS curriculum incorporates market demographics, communication techniques, marketing, common barriers and solutions, building codes and standards, product ideas and resources and business management. CAPS program graduates are required to maintain their designation by attending continuing education programs and/or participating in community service projects.

“I look forward to helping homeowners in the Triad make the changes they need to enable them to live in their homes for a long, long time,” said Preston.

For additional information about the CAPS program, visit www.nahb.org/caps.

Hurricane Florence Disaster Relief Fund

NCHBA DISASTER RELIEF ALERT
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Hurricane Florence left a wide path of destruction throughout the entire state and especially in central and eastern North Carolina.

In light of this disaster, the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Home Builders Educational & Charitable Foundation, Inc. (NCHBECF) announced the establishment of the “Hurricane Florence Disaster Relief Fund” to aid members of the North Carolina Home Builders Association (NCHBA) in recovering from the devastating effects of Hurricane Florence.

Please donate now online with a credit card or send a check addressed to:

Hurricane Florence Disaster Relief Fund
NCHBA
PO Box 99090
Raleigh, NC 27624

“Since rivers have yet to crest and flood waters recede, accurate damage estimates are not yet possible, however, we know our members in the affected areas have suffered greatly along with our fellow citizens,” said Gary Embler, NCHBECF Chairman. “We intend to help our members so they can in turn assist their neighbors.”

“The NCHBECF is a Sec. 501 (c)(3) entity conferring federal tax deductibility to donations,” said Mike Carpenter, NCHBA Executive Vice President. “I know our members will give generously in order to make the greatest impact possible.”

“As has always been the case in past natural disasters, home builders and tradespeople will be leading the way in rebuilding our state,” added current NCHBA President Alan Banks.

 

Give to NCHBA Hurricane Relief Fund