Fall Parade Golden Home Award Winners!

2019 Golden Home Award Winners


PLATINUM WINNERS


4  –  Homes by Jonathan Lee, Inc., 5312 Summer Hill Lane, Brookberry Farm

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GOLD WINNERS

2              Glen Homes LLC, 1619 Wisteria Drive, The Arbors at Meadowlark

3              RL Riddle Construction, LLC, 1637 Wisteria Drive, The Arbors at Meadowlark

5              Veritas Construction, 5639 Hundley Road, Brookberry Farm

8              Aher Builders, Inc., 183 Covington Place, Covington Place

9              Karl Stimpson Builders, Inc., 709 Fountain Brook Lane, Fountain Brook

10           Karl Stimpson Builders, Inc., 884 Fountain View Lane, Fountain Brook

21           Custom Homes by Hamrick, Inc., 3205 Buena Vista Road, Buena Vista

23           Frye Custom Homes, 4010 Carriage Manor Cove, French Coves

25           Longbuilt Construction, LLC, 985 Petree Road, Petree Ridge

26           Isenhour Homes LLC, 5427 Mercia Court, Sage Creek

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SILVER WINNERS

7              Isenhour Homes LLC, 5276 Shoal Creek Lane, Brookberry Farm – Walnut Ridge

12           Arden Group, LLC, 2784 Bartlett Lane, Bartlett Bluff

14           Sagamore Homes NC, Inc., 368 Dorchester Street, Rocklyn

18           Isenhour Homes LLC, 338 Wentworth Drive, Meadowlands

20           Elite Living, LLC, 2429 Waterwheel Drive, Millhaven Landing

24           Phil Strupe Builders, Inc., 977 Petree Road, Petree Ridge

27           Isenhour Homes LLC, 1491 Chickasha Drive, Vienna Estates

28           HFE Construction, LLC, 3589 Transou Road, Lochurst

32           Sagamore Homes NC, Inc, 204 Montreat Drive, Montreat

A Baby Boomers’ Guide to Aging in Place

A Baby Boomers’ Guide to Aging in Place
Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

If you’re one of the millions of American baby boomers approaching their 70s, you may be asking if now is an opportunity to move and downsize to a smaller, more manageable home, or to stay put in your current home and repurpose any extra space vacated by adult children.

The answer depends on your unique circumstances, of course. But for those who decide to stay put — at least for the time being — now is a great time to begin considering which, if any, modifications your home may require to better suit your needs and ensure your safety as you get older.

Rather than waiting until an incident occurs, be proactive about making alterations to your home that will help you avoid potential injury. Likewise, take advantage of a broad spectrum of new technologies that can make your home easier to manage and provide an extra layer of security.

Here are a few things to keep in mind if you are planning to “age in place.”

Prioritize Your Wish List

Take a good look at the rooms in your house to determine which ones fit your new lifestyle and which ones need some work. Some areas of the home might only need minor changes. Others might need to be repurposed altogether. Take the time to create a general plan and prioritize the items on your list.

Focus on Improving Livability

Many empty nesters hire expert remodelers to adapt their home to make it easier to maintain. Stairs can sometimes become a problem, but moving the master bedroom and the laundry room to the ground floor can be part of a solution. Doing so can give homeowners many more years in the home they love without a sense of urgency to move to a single-story home. Building professionals who have earned the National Association of Home Builders’ Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation have received training on how to build or renovate a home so that the occupants can live in it safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of their age.

Make Use of Technology

Everywhere you look these days, there is new technology. Why not put it to use in your house? Motion sensor light switches can illuminate a room as soon as you enter. They can also be connected with a home security and monitoring system, and could be configured to send help in the event of a fall or other accident. A smart refrigerator will notify you when you’re out of milk, or better yet, place an order to be delivered by your local grocer. A front door camera and microphone will allow you to see who is on your porch, even if you’re not there. If you can dream it up, there is likely a technology solution out there for it.

Expand Your Space

Depending on the age of your home, you may find that, for example, your master bedroom or bath is too small for comfort. Look for opportunities to expand those rooms into adjacent, unused or underutilized spaces. A remodeling professional is the best person to help you determine what your options are to build your dream master bathroom or bedroom. They can also help you find ways to create a more open floorplan that is easier to navigate for those with mobility concerns. Incorporating these changes will not only create a home that suits a changing lifestyle, they also may increase the value of your home when you eventually decide it’s time sell.

For more information on the most effective ways for empty nesters to remodel their home, contact Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem or visit www.hbaws.net.

New Trends in Outdoor Furniture and Fabrics

National Homeownership Month
Made to Last: New Trends in Outdoor Furniture and Fabrics
Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

Creating outdoor rooms remains a popular design trend with homeowners across the country. It’s a simple, budget-friendly way to increase your home’s square footage and to enjoy the great outdoors. Whether you have a large patio or a small porch, your outdoor room can easily reflect your style and become a treasured gathering spot in your home.

Yet, many homeowners quickly become frustrated when the beautiful furniture and fabrics they select do not survive the outdoor elements. Fortunately, manufacturers are now creating more durable outdoor furnishings to help your decorating dollars go even further.

Outdoor fabric companies, such as Sunbrella and Perennials, offer expanded lines of sun- and weather-resistant products that are made to withstand harsh weather. These resilient fabrics are low-maintenance and can easily be cleaned by hand. Despite the increased durability of these fabrics, they remain soft and comfortable for everyday use.

Retailers also are responding to the popularity of outdoor rooms by increasing their inventory of indoor/outdoor rugs, weatherproof cushions and fabrics, and all-weather furniture. Residential architect Amy Stacy, owner of Stacy Studio in Silver Spring, Md., has noticed the difference. “Even last summer, big-box stores may have only had three or four color choices for outdoor cushions. Now, you can choose from a wide variety of durable solids, patterns, florals, and stripes, both online and at all of the major home retailers,” Stacy said.

Homeowners also want to spend more time enjoying their outdoor space and less time maintaining it. “Screened-in porches are hot right now,” according to Stacy. “Home owners are looking for low-maintenance options and decks require a lot of upkeep.”

Not surprisingly, today’s screened porches reflect the growing trend of creating outdoor spaces with indoor amenities. Stacy says her clients are requesting fireplaces and other features – such as finished wood floors – to help their screened porches feel like luxurious indoor spaces. Other homeowners are adding kitchens to their screened porches, allowing them to more easily cook outdoors year-round.

Easy Maintenance Tips

After you’ve furnished and decorated your outdoor space, be sure to follow a few simple tips to ensure that you can enjoy it for years to come.

  • Protect outdoor furniture with weatherproof covers during the times of year when it’s not in use. Or, bring smaller furniture items inside.
  • Store cushions in weatherproof containers during winter weather – or if a big storm is on the way.
  • Spot clean spoils or spills on outdoor fabric right away to prevent the growth of mildew. Use a mild, bleach-free soap-and-water solution and rub gently with a cloth or sponge.
  • Always air-dry outdoor fabrics, which generally are made of synthetic materials. Never dry clean or tumble-dry these fabrics – or the protective finish will begin to erode.

For more information about creating and maintaining outdoor rooms in the Triad area contact Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem.

Trend Alert: Wet Rooms are Today’s Choice for Beautiful Bathrooms

Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

Trend Alert: Wet Rooms Are Today’s Choice for Beautiful, Usable Bathrooms

Inviting, accommodating and a feast for the eyes—wet rooms are showing up in more and more homes and wowing visitors at new-home showcases. Wet rooms—essentially open-concept or barrier-free bathrooms—are tiled continuously from floor to ceiling and across the floor surface, giving a sleek, unified appearance. The shower is open to the room or enclosed in clear glass, and has no raised threshold to step over. Sinks, countertops and vanities mounted to the walls hover above the unbroken plane of the floor.

The wet room’s uninterrupted sight lines give a feeling of space to even a relatively small room. The continuous floor surface makes for easy cleanup and allows people in wheelchairs or with restricted mobility to move freely.

Here are a few things to consider when designing your wet room:

Express Yourself

The open spaces and abundance of tile that define a wet room invite you to splash on your own creative look.

Whether you choose soothing earth tones and textures, cool minimalist grays, whites and blacks, or whimsical colors and patterns, the wet room creates an eye-catching display.

 

Curbless Shower

Because the entire room is waterproof, your curbless shower also can be completely open to the room, with no enclosure at all. Just be sure there’s enough space to place the toilet and sink where they won’t get splashed by spray from the shower.

Glass enclosures with seamless glass doors are another popular option. They’ll contain water on all sides without impeding the view.

Or sometimes simply a slab partition between the shower and the toilet will do the trick, leaving the front of the shower open to the rest of the room. The slab may be a foot or two short of the ceiling and face the doorway to minimize its effect on the visual flow.

Threshold drains—or grates that are flush with the tile floor—may define the edge of the shower area without interrupting the floor’s flow. Some drains even glow from within, using interior colored or white LED lighting for an extra flair and to help orient a person under the shower’s spray.

Another popular option is adding a place to sit in the shower. A built-in slate ledge, matching or contrasting with the wall tile, a wall-mounted drop-down bench in bamboo or a free-standing teak stool is a handy feature for anyone and contributes to the overall design.

 

Fixtures

Floating vanities, attached to the wall without legs, and floating countertops look great with today’s vessel sinks and minimalist faucets.

In addition to their sleek look, these features also provide sink access for anyone in a wheel chair. Drawers or shelves attached underneath or on each side of the sink provide storage.

 

Professional Installation

To be sure your wet room keeps the water where it’s supposed to be, it’s important that everything be installed just right, and that might require a professional.

Floor grading is key—constructed to slope gently and almost imperceptibly, but effectively, toward drains. Tile must be properly installed and sealed to prevent leaks.

Once it’s done right, your wet room will be easy to use, to clean and to enjoy—a lovely oasis in your home.

 

For more information or to find a contractor or remodeler to help you create your wet room, contact Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem or www.hbaws.net.

Fall Parade Association House

Fall Parade Association House

Fall Parade Association House Builder:
Wishon & Carter Builders, Inc.

We are pleased to formally announce our 2019 Fall Parade Association House builder is: Wishon & Carter Builders, Inc.

The location is: 5811 Zinfandel Street, The Arbors at Meadowlark

  • Wishon & Carter Builders understands the changing needs of the modern family, this home will prove timeless and exceptional. Low maintenance exterior with Tennessee Field Stone and Cementous siding, rocking chair front porch , private porch off the master suite. The interior has an open floor plan, main level master suite , main level guest room, flex space for office or library, spacious bedrooms and upper level playroom and game room. This is a wonderful time to purchase and customize!
  • Builder Contacts: Ted Baity 336.469.0507 or Randy Trinkle, 336.469.0508

If you have any questions about this project or interest in building the 2020 Fall Parade Association House, contact Darlene Saunders at HBAWS, 336.464.8000.

Open Floor Plans – Top Pick for Consumers

Open Floor Plans – Top Pick for Consumers

National Homeownership Month
Open Floor Plans Remain a Top Pick for Consumers
Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

Whether looking for a new home or revamping a current residence, home owners continue to be drawn to the feelings of spaciousness, easy flow and welcoming togetherness evoked by an open floor plan.

Pioneered in the early 20th century, open floor plans remain popular today, according to a recent survey from the National Association of Home Builders. The survey found that 70 percent of buyers want a kitchen-family room area that is either completely or partially open, with 32 percent wanting it completely open.

And owners of existing homes are choosing to open things up, too. Remodelers reported that 40 percent of their projects involve opening existing homes’ main floors by removing interior walls entirely or by using countertops, cut-throughs or archways, rather than full walls, to define separate areas in a more open way.

Main floors with few or no interior walls between areas for cooking, eating, relaxing and entertaining allow cooks to chat with family members or guests, provide easy flow for entertaining and enable parents to keep an eye on children from different areas.

Open floor plans not only maximize space and flow, they optimize natural light. Windows serve more than their immediate area, illuminating the entire space.

With the increasing focus on accessible design, open floor plans meet another of today’s needs— with fewer doorways, they are easier to navigate in a wheelchair or with a stroller.

To find a builder or remodeler visit: http://www.hbaws.net or visit nahb.org.

Perfect Getaway with a She Shed

Perfect Getaway with a She Shed

National Homeownership Month
Create the Perfect Getaway with a She Shed
Home Builders Association of Winston-Salem

We’ve all heard about the growing prevalence of man caves for years, but get ready for a lot more buzz about “she sheds.” A she shed is a free standing building in your home’s backyard – a space where a woman can go to invest time in her hobbies, get some work done, or just relax and get away from the hustle and bustle of the home. Sound like a great project to take on? Here are some of the most popular uses for she sheds:

Art and Crafting Studio

The she shed gives you a great opportunity to invest more time and intention in your passions. If you’re an artist, whether professionally or as a hobby, create a space dedicated to your craft. To make the space work, invest in some storage solutions to organize all of your crafting supplies, or finally get that easel you’ve been wanting but didn’t have space for in the main house. If you’re a photographer, you can even look into turning your she shed into a darkroom or photography studio.

 Outdoor Seating

Think about adding a bench or a small table and a couple of chairs in front of your she shed so you can sit with a friend and enjoy some beautiful weather with your favorite beverage. It’ll feel like you’re at a chic cafe but in the comfort of your own backyard. Don’t forget to make sure the furniture and fabrics are weatherproof so you won’t have to worry about dragging it inside whenever it rains or snows.

 Reading Nook

Consider making your she shed a screen-free space. You don’t want to risk it becoming just another place where you go to zone out and stare at the TV. Instead, opt for a dedicated reading space. You can go with a classic window nook, or get a stylish day bed and cover it in throw pillows. Who knows, you might even use it as a place to sneak in an afternoon nap. Finish it off with a free-standing bookcase or mount some quick and easy shelves on the wall to hold all those books you’ve been wanting to read.

Exercise or Office Space

If your passion is yoga, pilates, or weight lifting, you can turn your she shed into a space where you can blast your favorite music in a dedicated work-out space. Or, if you’re looking for a place to hunker down and focus on work, your she shed could become an office where you can go to write, brainstorm, make phone calls, or whatever else your professional life requires.

At the end of the day, your special space should be a reflection of you – a place where you love to spend time, whether it’s relaxing, creating, or getting work done. Have fun with it and make it into something that enhances your life.

To find a professional who can help you create your perfect she shed, contact Home Builders Association of  Winston-Salem 336.768.5942.

Home Buyer’s Dictionary

Home Buyer’s Dictionary

Home Buyer’s Dictionary

ARM? GPM? PITI? You’d have to be a cryptologist to figure out some of the terms buyers encounter during the home buying process. Doing research on how to buy a house before beginning the process can greatly improve your experience and prepare you for the exciting course ahead. And with this glossary of home buying terms at your side, you can rest easy that your new home won’t get lost in translation.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM). A loan whose interest rate is adjusted according to movements in the financial market.

Amortization. A payment plan by which a borrower reduces a debt gradually through monthly payments of principal and interest.

Annual Percentage Rate (APR). The annual cost off credit over the life of a loan, including interest, service charges, points, loan fees, mortgage insurance, and other items.

Appraisal. An evaluation to determine what a piece of property would sell for in the marketplace.

Appreciation. The increase in the value of a property.

Assessment. A tax levied on a property or a value placed on the worth of property by a taxing authority.

Assumption. A transaction allowing the buyer of a home to assume responsibility for an existing loan on the home instead of getting a new loan.

Balloon. A loan which has a series of monthly payments (often for 5 years or less) with the remaining balance due in a large lump sum payment at the end.

Binder. A receipt for a deposit paid to secure the right to purchase a home at terms agreed upon by the buyer and seller.

Buydown. A subsidy (usually paid by a builder or developer) to reduce the monthly payments on a mortgage loan.

Cap. A limit to the amount an interest rate or a monthly payment can increase for an adjustable rate loan either during an adjustment period or over the life of the loan.

Certificate of Occupancy. A document from an official agency stating that the property meets the requirements of local codes, ordinances, and regulations.

Closing. A meeting to sign documents which transfer property from a seller to a buyer. (Also called settlement)

Closing Costs. Charges paid at settlement for obtaining a mortgage loan and transferring real estate title.

Conditions, Covenants, and Restrictions (CC and Rs). The standards that define how a property may be used and the protections the developer has made for the benefit of all owners in a subdivision.

Condominium. A home in a multi-unit complex; each purchaser owns an individual unit, and all the purchasers jointly own the common areas, such as the surrounding land, hallways, etc.

Conventional Loan. A mortgage loan not insured by a government agency (such as FHA or VA).

Convertibility. The ability to change a loan from an adjustable rate schedule to a fixed rate schedule.

Cooperative. A form of ownership in a multi-unit complex; the purchasers own shares of the entire complex rather than owning individual units.

Credit Rating. A report ordered by a lender from a credit bureau to determine if the borrower is a good credit risk.

Default. A breach of a mortgage contract (such as not making monthly payments).

Density. The number of homes built on a particular acre of land. Allowable densities are usually determined by local jurisdictions.

Downpayment. The difference between the sales price and the mortgage amount on a home. The downpayment is usually paid at closing.

Due-on-Sale. A clause in a mortgage contract requiring the borrower to pay the entire outstanding balance upon sale or transfer of the property. A mortgage with a due-on-sale clause is not assumable.

Earnest Money. A sum paid to the seller to show that a potential purchaser is serious about buying.

Easement. Right-of-way granted to a person or company authorizing access to the owner’s land; for example, a utility company may be grated an easement to install pipes or wires. An owner may voluntarily grant an easement, or in some cases, be compelled to grant one by a local jurisdiction.

Equity. The difference between the value of a home and what is owed on it.

Escrow. The handling of funds or documents by a third party on behalf of the buyer and/or seller.

Federal Housing Administration (FHA). A federal agency which insures mortgages that have lower downpayment requirements than conventional loans.

Fixed Rate Mortgage. A mortgage whose interest rate remains constant over the life of the loan. The payments are not necessarily level. (See Graduated Payment Mortgage and Growing Equity Mortgage).

Fixed Schedule Mortgage. A mortgage whose payment schedule for the life of the loan is established at closing. The payments and interest rate are not necessarily level.

Graduated Payment Mortgage (GPM). A fixed-rate, fixed-schedule loan which starts with lower payments than a level payment loan; the payments rise annually over the first 5 to 10 years and then remain constant for the remainder of the loan. GPMs involve negative amortization.

Growing Equity Mortgage (Rapid Payoff Mortgage). A fixed-rate, fixed-schedule loan which starts with the same payments as a level payment loan; the payments rise annually, with the entire increase being used to reduce the outstanding balance. No negative amortization occurs, and the increase in payments may enable the borrower to pay off a 30-year loan in 15 to 20 years, or less.

Hazard Insurance. Protection against damage caused by fire, windstorm, or other common hazards. Many lenders require borrowers to carry it in an amount at least equal to the mortgage.

Housing Finance Agency. A state agency which offers a limited amount of below-market-rate home financing for low-and moderate-income households.

Index. The interest rate or adjustment standard which determines the changes in monthly payments for an adjustable rate loan.

Infrastructure. The public facilities and services needed to support residential development, including highways, bridges, schools, and sewer and water systems

Interest. The cost paid to a lender for the use of borrowed money.

Joint Tenancy. A form of ownership by which the tenants own a property equally. If one dies, the other would automatically inherit the entire property.

Level Payment Mortgage. A mortgage whose payments are identical for each month over the life of the loan.

Mortgage Broker. A broker who represents numerous lenders and helps consumers find affordable mortgages; the broker charges a fee only if the consumer fins a loan.

Mortgage Commitment. A formal written communication by a lender, agreeing to make a mortgage loan on a specific property, specifying the loan amount, length of time and conditions.

Mortgage Company (Mortgage Banker). A company that borrows money from a bank, lends it to consumers who want to buy homes, then sells the loans to investors.

Mortgagee. The lender who makes a mortgage loan.

Mortgage Loan. A contract in which the borrower’s property is pledged a s collateral and which can be repaid in installments over a long period. The mortgagor (buyer) promises to repay principal and interest, to keep the home insured, to pay all taxes, and to keep the property in good condition.

Mortgage Origination Fee. A charge by a lender for the work involved in preparing and servicing a mortgage application (usually 1 percent of the loan amount).

Negative Amortization. An increase in the outstanding balance of a loan when a monthly payment is not large enough to cover all of the interest due.

Note. A formal document showing the existence of a debt and stating the terms of repayment.

PITI. Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (the 4 major components of monthly housing payments).

Point. A charge of 1 percent of the mortgage amount. Points are a one-time charge assessed by the lender at closing to increase the interest yield on a mortgage loan.

Prepayment. Payment of all or part of a debt prior to its maturity.

Principal. The amount borrowed in a loan, excluding interest and other charges.

Property Survey. A survey to determine the boundaries of your property. The cost will depend on the complexity of the survey.

Rapid Payoff Mortgage. (See Growing Equity Mortgage).

Recording Fee. A charge for recording the transfer of a property, paid to a city, county, or other appropriate branch of government.

Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA). A federal law requiring lenders to provide home buyers with information about known or estimated settlement costs. The act also regulates other aspects of settlement procedures.

R-Value. The resistance of insulation material (including windows) to heat passing through it. The higher the number, the greater the insulating value.

Sales Contract. A contract between a buyer and seller which should explain, in detail, exactly what the purchase includes, what guarantees there are, when the buyer can move in, what the closing costs are, and what recourse the parties have if the contract is not fulfilled or if the buyer cannot get a mortgage commitment at the agreed-upon terms.

Settlement. (See Closing).

Shared Appreciation Mortgage. A loan in which partners agree to share specified portions of the downpayment, monthly payment, and appreciation.

Tenancy in Common. A form of ownership in which the tenants own separate but equal parts. To inherit the property, a surviving tenant would either have to be mentioned in the will or, in the absence of a will, be eligible through state inheritance laws.

Title. Evidence (usually in the form of a certificate or deed) of a person’s legal right to ownership of a property.

Transfer Taxes. Taxes levied on the transfer of property or on real estate loans by state and/or local jurisdictions.

Veterans Administration (VA). A federal agency which insures mortgage loans with very liberal downpayment requirements for honorably discharged veterans and their surviving spouses.

Walk-Through. A final inspection of a home before settlement to search for problems that need to be corrected before ownership changes hands.

Warranty. A promise, either written or implied, that the material and workmanship of a product is defect-free or will meet a specified level of performance over a specified period of time. Written warranties on new homes are either backed by insurance companies or by the builders themselves.

Zoning. Regulations established by local governments regarding the location, height, and use for any given piece of property within a specific area.